Photo Credit: IFPRI

The 2017 Global Hunger Index (GHI), released today, reports that between 2000 and 2016, hunger levels around the world declined by 27 percent. While impressive, however, this progress should not mask the remaining food security challenges faced at the global, national, and sub-national levels. In 2017, South Sudan declared a state of famine – the first instance of famine in the world in six years.

Photo Credit: Paul Stephens / IRIN

After years of steady decline, the number of chronically hungry people around the world appears to be on the rise again. In addition, the challenge of malnutrition is getting increasingly complex, with many countries facing simultaneous burdens of undernutrition and obesity.

These are two major messages coming out of the latest The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, published by FAO, IFAD, UNICEF, WHO, and WFP.

Photo Credit: FAO GIEWS

The latest Crop Prospects and Food Situation report from FAO was recently released. Published quarterly, these reports focus on developments affecting the food situation of developing countries and Low-Income Food-Deficit Countries (LIFDCs). The report also includes an overview of global cereal production prospects and highlight countries that require external food assistance.

Photo Credit: Neil Palmer/CIAT

The latest editions of the FAO Food Price Index and AMIS Market Monitor are both now available for September.

With about one-third of all food produced around the world lost or wasted each year, reducing food loss and waste is a key component in ending hunger and malnutrition. A major hurdle, however, stems from the fact that food loss and waste are complex issues, and thus properly measuring them and identifying where in the food system they occur remain a challenge.

In recent years, many developing countries have seen significant reductions in chronic childhood malnutrition. Understanding what is driving these reductions is key in scaling up effective nutrition policies and strategies and reaching the nutrition goals set out in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

World Water Week 2017, from running from August 27- September 1 and organized by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) explores the theme of water and waste (reduce and reuse). Water clearly plays a crucial role in global development, impacting agricultural production, economic growth, health and nutrition, and the environment.

According to the most recent World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) Report, global wheat supplies for 2017-2018 are up significantly due to an 8.6-million-ton production increase in the Former Soviet Union (FSU). Russian wheat production surpassed last year’s record by 5.0 million tons. Even though there are reduced production forecasts in Canada, EU, and U.S. the increased production from FSU more than offsets these conditions; as a result, foreign trade has increased from the FSU as well.

Photo Credit: Imran Sohail

The latest Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin from FAO cites higher global wheat export prices in July, up 6 percent from June and 28 percent from July 2016. Continued hot, dry weather raised concerns about availability, particularly of high-quality wheat; the European Union and the Black Sea region also saw harvest delays, further pushing up prices.

Photo Credit: Martin LaBar

The most recent edition of the FAO Food Price Index rose to 179.1 points in July, up 3.9 points from June and 10.2 percent above July 2016 levels. This marks the third month of consecutive increase. Supply constraints and currency movements supported to cereal, sugar, and dairy prices. Meat values remained steady in July, while vegetable oil prices fell.

Share